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It Matters a Lot What You Allow in Your Head:
The Truth About Pornography

by JoAnn Hibbert Hamilton


Common objections:

"It's a first amendment right."
  1. All civilized nations have laws. Laws establish limits.
  2. Driving with a certain alcohol limit is an example of this. Drug use is regulated. Having speed limits and zoning laws are other examples.
  3. There are laws about what is legal pornography.
  4. Pornography laws have not been enforced under Pres. Clinton, but the laws are there. There are federal laws that do not allow pornography to cross state lines, laws against child pornography and obscenity laws.
  5. There is material on the internet and in book stores that violate our national obscenity laws.
  6. Community standards regulate soft core pornography and these standards vary from one area to another.
  7. It isn't a first amendment right to hurt my children by introducing them to sexual concepts.
  8. Censorship? Stores choose what brand of beans they sell. You choose what books or videos you sell. No one is forced to sell pornography.

"It doesn't hurt anyone."
  1. There have been 503 incidents of patrons accessing internet pornography in public libraries, incidents which include a molestation, several attempted molestations, and adults exposing children to pornography. (Pittsburgh Coalition Against Pornography 412-281-4565, 100 Ross Street, Lower Level, Pittsburgh PA 15219) Many other incidents go unreported.
  2. In areas near sexually oriented businesses there are:
  3. Higher crime rates
  4. Decreased property value
  5. Prostitution on or near premises
  6. Public sex, public urination
  7. Exposure to offensive speech, material, performance (Ibid.)
  8. Pornography always escalates.
  9. A primary consumer group of pornography is adolescent boys ages 12-17. (Ibid.) Internet pornography can cause addiction in as short a time as 3 months and in some cases two weeks.)
  10. 87% of convicted molesters of girls and 77% of convicted molesters of boys admit to use of pornography, most often in the commission of their crimes. (Ibid.)
  11. 865 of rapists admitted regular use of pornography, with 57% admitting actual imitation of pornography scenes in commission of sex crimes. (Ibid.)
  12. In 42% of 48,000 sex crimes investigated in Michigan, police indicated that pornography was involved - used just prior to, or during the act of sexual assault. (Ibid.)
  13. Children often abuse other children in the name of "play" after they have been exposed to pornography.
  14. Husbands don't treat their wives as well. Intimacy is lost as well as respect.
  15. Seventy percent of the pornography sold is found by children.
  16. Children share what they find with their friends.
  17. Marriages break up. Welfare roles increase.
  18. People don't forget what they see even if it is accidental exposure in a store.
  19. Husbands make demands for unnatural sex. The trouble is that pornography changes a person's way of thinking, and so pornography users think unnatural sex is normal.
  20. Indecency and exhibitionism is forced on others. Sex.
  21. Exposure to pornography, compared with exposure to neutral material, led males to perceive their own female mates as sexually less attractive.
  22. Exposure to standard pornography (people having consensual, nonviolent sex) resulted in a loss of compassion toward women in general.
  23. Much pornography pairs violent, degrading, humiliating images with more ordinary sexual stimuli. By pairing the bad with acceptable sexual actions, people normalize what is unnatural.
  24. Pornography can lead to sexual deviancy for disturbed and normal people alike. It is progressively addictive. (Ibid. entire section.)
Pornography Harmless? You Be The Judge!

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